Tag Archives: Kindle book

Pearls of Wisdom

SS

BOOK REVIEW: What I take from Soul Searching is simplicity. Not that nature and human nature are anything short of vastly complex – but that the key is always simplicity. To stop and feel the truth settle over you. To give in to the simplicity of nature’s will… Of course, it is often so hard to see things clearly in life. This series of wise and insightful poems offer a lot of hope and comfort. They also ask some very meaningful questions.

Here are a list of my favourites: Board Game. No Regrets. Who Says? Old Soul. A Promise. Seasons of life. Forgive us Mother. The Whisperer.

And the individual ideas that intrigued me most:
Go on and Seek: Go on, dare yourself and then do. Your life owes it to you.
Nature’s Songs: The richness of a dark starry night. Silence, yet pregnant with promises of a new day….
Death: Her life she had lived it well, no soul she had hurt no lies did she tell.
Heartbeats: But feelings have a home in our hearts, good or bad.
Innocence: Touching in its simplicity.
Rewind Button: We cannot undo the moment that just passed.
The Well of Hope: She looks up, tired eyes searching for respite. Dried out clouds offer her no hope, no shade.
Rain: Finally it rained and the earth drank its fill.
Hope: Hope has left her heart. A place too dark for it to survive.
Seasons of Life: The soul, too tired to remember its past. Now sits in the dark, awaiting a new chapter.
Self Acceptance: Self acceptance can grow in the rockiest of gardens.
Self Acceptance: Your life meant just for you, and no other.
The Whisperer: The one that makes the glitter in gold. Overshadow everything else in the world.

IAW

 

BOOK REVIEW: Brilliance brilliantly presented… The title of this book is spot on. Inspiration and wisdom indeed. More of both than any one of us could probably consume in a lifetime. So what becomes important here is the layout and presentation, which is five star… Pick a field of knowledge from the table of contents. Click on it, flip a page or two, read a quote and soak in the brilliance of Ralph Waldo Emerson. Back to the TOC and click another…. This is a terrific selection of quotes, laid out and presented simply and intelligently. What a great pocket book to fill a spare moment here and there and get you thinking.

Erotica with classic storytelling

ES

BOOK REVIEW: I’m just going to lead in with a word or two about Chapter 5: Lord Of Devil’s Night. Let’s make it two words: frigging awesome… Overall this is a varied line-up of creepy and erotic stories with a sometimes conversational tone that adds clever subtlety. Ratz in the Machine tells us to beware the nerdy nice guy, and has a surprising and quite brilliant shift from erotic to horrifying. The Hangin’ Tree, almost poetic, takes you down deep and has you wondering. The Bag Snatchers is freaky, imaginative, and nails the spirit of All Hallows Eve. Voices is the creepy, atmospheric one of the bunch, and A Grim Tribute is grim alright. It’s a seriously twisted tribute to a fairy tale that was little-kid-scary already. But getting back to Lord Of Devil’s Night… You know how it’s so great when you are right inside the characters head? Well perhaps you won’t want to be inside this particular guy’s head but you don’t have any choice. You’re pulled in and forced to experience a blend of eroticism and pain that is thematic metaphor on overload. And… well… good luck with that.

AAE

 

BOOK REVIEW: This story has a lot going for it in a number of ways. Awesome detail and imaginative ideas create a tangible and believable fantasy world – believable enough to pull you out of the real world that is. The heroine and hero both rock. You’re on their side from the start (although they’re on opposite sides) and you’re right there with them when all seems lost at the end. The emotional journey here is expertly crafted. It’s simple and true – a wonderful exposé of the power of love, including the flavours of lust and physical pleasure. The overall idea is tantalising with a touch of humour – life in the Men’s Tent looks pretty good to me… way to be imprisoned:) This is a captivating tale with an ending that tops everything I’ve mentioned so far.

Gripping: true to life

K

BOOK REVIEW: A sensational read with not an ounce of sensationalism. That’s my overall take on this multidimensional tale of life in Southall, London. Most stories quite rightly use something for shock value – romance, action, intrigue, horror…. Within this book there are no less than half a dozen incidents/circumstances that could be expounded and sensationalised, but they are not. Their masterly subtle telling is what gives this tale such depth and dimension – there for us to wonder and imagine as we experience the real lives of these humble, ordinary people…. This was a cultural journey for me. I’m sure readers from within will enjoy the familiar surrounds. I found the experience enlightening – also interesting in the way love finds a way, even if the original union has been arranged…. To me this novel reads as understated. It’s impressive the way the author leaves the conclusions to us – the way she gives us just enough to inspire contemplation. It reads as absolutely real and true to life, and, as such, fascinating!

SFBF

 

BOOK REVIEW: My first impression first: the creation of the bully and the victim of bullying is brilliant. Next, I thoroughly enjoyed the time period and location. I’m old enough to remember a little of the 60s. This book took me there. I also grew up in an underprivileged neighbourhood. This book dragged me back there too. The quality of the storytelling blotted out the here and now completely. Those are the aspects of this novel I want to praise highly. The story itself is solid and quite intriguing. It’s raw and violent, and has plenty going for it. A terrific array of characters brought to life – they feel real. It’s like the whole novel is neither under nor overstated. Just real… I’d recommend reading a sample and seeing if you can put it down.